Fearful Symmetries by Bogdan Dumitrica

Bogdan Dumitrica’s series Fearful Symmetries is an inviting collection of oil paintings renditions on paper of natural organic remains. Exhibiting at Los Angeles Artcore Center for the Arts, his series consists of fifteen 44”x 30” artworks. Dumitrica received his Master of Fine Arts degree from California State University, Los Angeles in 2001. In 1995 he was awarded the Art Matters Foundation Grant. He has exhibited at international art biennials in Egypt and Korea with his ceramic works.  His art has traveled across the United States and Europe exhibiting his creative endeavors.

An admirer of classical contemporary music and literature, Dumitrica draws inspiration for his most recent artwork from composer John C. Adams’s 1988 animated and expressive musical with the same title of the exhibition; Fearful Symmetries

Pinned directly to the exhibiting walls with no interlocutor in between, Dumitrica’s organic depictions of decomposed cactus leaves, branches and fibrous natural objects spatially navigate between negative space and the projection of weightlessness.The void surrounding the organic images allow him to develop a three-dimensional illusion on a two dimensional flat plain. His chosen color scheme are desert warm subtle off-whites, ochre, light greens and grays with gentle strokes of amber. The minuscule details of the crevasses and contours enhance the aging state of each painted. The journey of decay and weathering are for Dumitrica, the documentation of accumulated time recycling itself through an organic process.  

In Dumitrica’s work, the organic found objects have acquired a binary connection with the inorganic manmade objects. His Pistolero series one through five, paintings of dried wood branches can be seen as inorganic renditions of antique pistols. A second painting of a dried out, long extensive curled leaf simulates a propeller. The same can be said of a decomposing desert flower titled Stellar Regions that resembles the mapping of a star constellation.

With Egyptian Forms Dumitrica captures the beautiful cylindrical forms of Egyptian rural bird houses build of mud. The use of natural elements in the construction of the birdhouses releases, at first sight, a mystery and wonder. There is a scene of pleasure in viewing the birdhouses in a most natural state.

The idea of appearing, disappearing and recycling reveal a process of existence in a world that is constantly fusing and un-fusing. His low profile double play with organic and inorganic materials and forms unveil a connection between cultural symbols and daily use objects. Time is of the essence in this series, it is the main character that gives identity and meaning to his work. Dumitrica brings out the beauty in decay. He also poses a question between finite and the infinite. The endlessness of time dissipates with coming of erosion and the cycles of all the weathering elements.

The sense of suspension in his paintings can be compared to that our planet suspended in a universe constantly remaking itself, while the negative space questions natural weathering vs. the unnatural and manmade decomposing ways of destruction.

John C, Adams’s composition Fearful Symmetries is a revealing musical that ties in very well with Dumitrica’s paintings. Both question life. Both reveal the mechanical material objects and the impact it has on our daily lives. Dumitrica exposes our time as a minute moment of existence with the hopes it can reflect a more harmonic revelation of what we produce and what we become.

 

Jimmy Centeno

Writer

Jimmycntno@gmail.com

December 14,2017

At Any Cost: Revealing the Cost by Carla Viparelli

At Any Cost: Revealing the Cost by Carla Viparelli

At Any Cost is the title of artist Carla Viparelli exhibition at the L.A Artcore Brewery Annex. The electrifying and provocative title puts the perils faced by migrants from the global south who seek refuge and a better life in rich countries situate in the global north. This exhibition at the Brewery Annex ends her four month residency in Los Angeles California. Viparelli’s multidisciplinary career extends from a Master in philosophy from Naples University in Italy to international art workshops around the world.

 At Any Cost originally began as a video Installation which later turned into painted canvases. The exodus and departure from the global south is best depicted by Viparelli’s archeological approach of unearthing to rediscover and reveal an old and ancient practice by all prior cultures and civilizations; migration.

 Viparelli’ series touches on three aspects of her exhibition, The Myth, The History and The Present by simulating ancient fragments of Roman clay pottery as her springboard to an open conversation on today’s migration. The juxtaposition between pottery fragments decorated with ancient pictorial patterns along silhouettes of children, men and women exposes the search and journey of migrants in a state of uncertainty. There is an ambiguity as to how migrants will be viewed either with suspicion or apprehensiveness or with benevolent eyes from the north can reveal embedded myths and stereotypes. Through this metaphor Viparelli draws a closer examination via the arts on a heated subject that is often demonized and misunderstood.

Her animated video installation projects a shadow of a voyaging ship onto the bottom surface of what simulates the base of an ocean floor.  The shadows cast rowing arms thrusting across a body of water with fragments of scattered clay pottery. The faceless images of unknown people are stamped by the magnifying sun at the bottom of an ocean. Viparelli brings to light the concealed and invisible faces in search of a landing they can call home.

Viparelli’s work is active and an engaging philosophical dialogue that attempts to piece together a fragmented narrative between western perceptions of otherness and the contributing colonial factors that have more than often impeded the global south its own self determination. This exhibition is an interdisciplinary act that questions current world affairs and its collective responsibility to bring to evidence the push and pull factors that have forced thousands to flee their home.

It is a timely exhibition during xenophobic reactions in Europe with the arrival of migrants and refuges from the Middle East and Africa, and anti-immigrant legislation in the United States with the building of a wall along the border between The United States and Mexico. Viparelli’s art is a sensitive response to an urgent historical moment that seeks to make sense of it all. 

                                                                                                                                                           

Jimmy Centeno

Writer

jimmycntno@gmail.com

November 30, 2017

 

 

Heavenly Maiden and Daily Practices by Wakana Kimura

Artist Wakana Kimura is an MFA graduate of Otis College of Art and Design and has a BFA from Tokyo University of Fine Arts. Her Exhibition at the L.A Artcore Center in Little Tokyo presents her most recent mixed media visual narrative series: Heavenly Maiden and Daily Practices on paper. Originally from Japan, Kimura now resides in Los Angeles CA. She’s recently been awarded the Cultural Trailblazers Fellowship Award by The Department of Cultural Affair of Los Angeles and is currently exhibiting artwork at the Los Angeles Union Station Metro public art program: Through the Eyes of Artists.

Her daily art ritual begins with a series of what she calls Daily Practice consisting of small intimate drawings. This series is a meditation of spontaneous practices of short washes consisting of multiple colors brushed and dotted abstract patterns on 4”x6” paper. For Kimura, such practice is a way to keep the hand rhythmically tuned and exercised for larger pieces that measure up to 35 feet long. Daily Practices are instant flashes of interactions between simple and beautiful unforeseen shapes with a fluidity that radiates a sense of tranquility and inner peace.  This practice is the birth that inspires her larger calligraphy style paintings.

The main centerpiece of her Heavenly Maiden series is a large 77”x98” mixed media painting on washi paper roll Titled: Nirvana/The death of Buddha, 2017. This piece commemorates the passing of Buddha’s life on earth to the ultimate afterlife goal of an enlightenment being also known as nirvana. The spiritual leader’s death took place 2500 hundred years ago on February 15 under a silvery moon which is depicted in the painting. Buddha is seen in a state of serenity no longer living the negation of desires that bring much suffering. It is a scene surrounded by mourners, men, woman, elders, and animals in grief witnessing the departure of Buddha to nirvana. The spiritual leader left behind all privileges of royalty while seeking the true purpose of life. It is done with watercolors, markers, and Sumi ink, in midnight blues layered between reds, pinks, violets and small hints of gold. Kimura is very much interested in looking at the different interpretations of Buddha’s Nirvana departure by other artists beginning in India spreading through diverse regions of Asia and other places across the world. In this particular piece Kimura shares the translucent overlap process that reveals her approach and technique.  She assembles the narrative of Buddha’s death with expressive imagery and patterns done with quick short and longs wide brushstrokes of paints that swim in every possible direction.  

Kimura brings a refreshing Japanese heritage in this body of work. It is a combination between contemporary styles and traditional methods. It is here were she reveals the magic at the end of every brushstroke she performs on paper. Kimura captures in her art a spontaneous process between beauty and the mystery behind the constant change of life. She adds energy to the visual experience that can center at any given point without losing sight of the total sum of lines, curves, and shapes invested in every artwork she creates.

Jimmy Centeno

Writer

November 30, 2017

jimmycntno@gmail.com