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AUGUST 2014: At Little Tokyo. . MICHAEL WOOD, DANI VINOKUROV and KARRIE ROSS . . . At the Brewery Annex MICHELLE OH, HIROKO YOSHIMOTO and KATHY YOUN SOOK KIM (Reception Aug 3) and later this month TOYOKO KATSUMATA, ROBERT WALKER, MITSUNORI KURASHIGE and ARIMICHI IWASAWA. . . LA Artcore has served Los Angeles for 35 years as a 501(c)3 nonprofit, and relies entirely on gifts from the public - please support our mission and make a donation today.
AUGUST 2014

LA Artcore Union Center for the Arts (Little Tokyo)


LA Artcore Brewery Annex
(Lincoln Heights)



Aug 3 - 31

MICHAEL FREITAS WOOD
DANI VINOKUROV
KARRIE ROSS

 

July 20 - Aug 15

MICHELLE OH
HIROKO YOSHIMOTO
KATHY YOUN SOOK KIM

Aug 17 - 31

TOYOKO KATSUMATA
ROBERT WALKER
MITSUNORI KURASHIGE
ARIMICHI IWASAWA




Opening Reception:
Sunday, August 3rd, 2014 3-5PM
Conversation with the Artists: 4PM


PRESS RELEASE

L.A. Artcore is pleased to announce this drawing and painting show that reveals in its artists, an attraction to craft and the intimate role it plays in each artist's methodical and intuitive processes.

The abstract paintings of Michael Freitas Wood are formed from numerous and overlaid handmade grids whose intricate structural buildup and exploration of color differentiate between compositions whose undulating and patterned effects are made active by underlying geometric forms that describe and an overall structure whose character fluidly travels between architectural elements, technological imprints, textile design (to name a few) and visually inquires about them through a lens similar to that of an archaeologist, anthropologist and/or sociologist engaging with the state of civilization past and present.
The intricate lattice structures that make up Wood's paintings are created with pigmented-plaster that is thinly applied through strips of tape giving Wood the desired definition of a hard edge. But repeating this technique numerous times while layering them over and over yields optically-vibrating images that are produced between chromatic variation and distinguished by alternating forms.

In the curiously-inspired art of Dani Vinokurov, the artist exclaims, "My collages are one part magic, one part dreamscape, one part folk art, and one part nature." Vinokurov's  visual narrative unfolds through tiny ink drawings, meticulous paper cuts, watercolor washes, miniature weavings, and embroidery. In the artist's words, "Each collage is a place where the conscious and subconscious minds intersect—a place of luscious and whimsical environments where flora and fauna interact with repeat-pattern design to tell a story of femininity, folklore, and fantasy."

At its core, the direct aesthetic world of human, animal and natural imagery in Karrie Ross' art correlates with the development of the artist's working techniques on paper. Yet, the artist describes her process of discovery as one that is intertwined with learning about matter itself, Ross expresses equal fascination for the implications of science and its detections of matter vibrating at a subatomic level and producing frequencies, which the artist conveys as, "...a fascination with the internal vibrations of the atom; that everything vibrates. That concept was brought really close to me back when I was around nineteen. A man walked up to the counter I was working at and slammed his hand on it and he said, "Do you know that that's moving!?" and I was a dumbfounded young girl going, "Okay, he's a customer, what do I do?" Well, come to find out, that everything has a frequency. If we meet that frequency of what we want, the universe can't help but give us that frequency." Needless to say, Ross captures the simultaneous interactions between materials and symbolic imagery. Ross vividly recalls  a childhood experience of being outside in the yard during an earthquake, and being called after by her mom from inside while a bee flew into her dress, this being of a dreamlike quality whose absurdity of simultaneous events has become the defining quality of her art.


Artist's Websites:

Michael Freitas Wood


Dani Vinokurov


Karrie Ross






 



MICHELLE OH
HIROKO YOSHIMOTO
KATHY YOUN SOOK KIM

Opening Reception:
Sunday, August 3rd, 2014 1-3PM
Conversation with the Artist: 2PM


PRESS RELEASE

For the first of two exhibits this month at Artcore’s Brewery Annex, three painters will display their love of using intense color in creating abstract art.  Each artist has working methods that are unique, making for a stimulating view of how many different directions we can go starting from the same basic departure of a single medium.

Michelle Oh is a very gestural painter, working with great sweeps of color, wet on wet combined with marks and swirls, seeking to capture the closest simulation of her emotional state.  She believes this physical action will inevitably reveal the deeper, more complicated side of her humanity.  Reflecting that the questions we ask about life, and the answers we form, ultimately sculpt our inner lives in a way that is reproduced in our feelings and everyday actions, painting is a place where the deepest convictions can be revealed in the simplest, most purely emotive way.

Hiroko Yoshimoto lives in Ventura County, where she is active in cross-disciplined use of her talents in arenas like theatre and music.  Her paintings are tremendous, vibrant samples of the seeming chaos of organic life, more collision than composition, a kind of balance that is a real spectacle to behold.  Working as though the canvas had no edges, the complex and defined elements of color produce purely abstract results, but of a effortless complexity that could only be reproduced in close-up views in nature’s own texture, like a handful of sand under a magnifying glass, or the life-forms that fill every droplet of seawater.

Kathy Youn Sook Kim creates compositional abstractions that scratch and collide themselves into taut surfaces full of tension.  Using color to create space and distance, using mark to join and relate, the artist has an up-close, manual approach to her painting.  The intense working of the surface collects the hours and days of activity, creating a record of the artist’s presence.  The overall result is a kind of static formed entirely of color, and nicely contrasts the other painters.

 

 

Artist's Websites:

Michelle Oh

Hiroko Yoshimoto

Kathy Youn Sook Kim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and
later in August...



Aug 17 - 31

TOYOKO KATSUMATA
ROBERT WALKER
MITSUNORI KURASHIGE
ARIMICHI IWASAWA


Opening Reception:
Sunday, August 17th, 2014 1-3PM
Conversation with the Artist: 2PM


PRESS RELEASE

LA Artcore presents four artists whose work has in common strong relationships with the dreaming of reality and the physicality of materials.  They also share strong influences drawn from Japanese ways of thinking, producing artwork that is contemplative and strives to focus to an elegant and effective point.

Toyoko Katsumata creates sleek and modern sculptural installations that investigate and deconstruct the human body.  She seeks a balance between distance and disorienting intimacy by working with bare materials such as metal, plastic or water, placing them in interaction with the dimensions of a room, along with materials that mimic or focus on the organic flesh.   She creates combinations to evoke conflicting feelings of comfort, solitude, utility and confinement that relate to the experience of having a body.

Robert Walker has a track record of achieving the extraordinary, a consistent and changing practice using equal measures of complexity and reserve. Each work involves a physicality of effort while retaining an intuitive spirit, a balance of confidence and risk that achieves what may be the most desirable state in abstract art making.  Many artists settle into a signature style that defines the perimeter of their career, or have clear periods usually defined by a change in materials.  For Walker that bar is considerably raised, it is impossible to predict with each show precisely what form the work will take, but what can be expected is considered reworking, a flexible mind producing fresh, intelligent works again and again.

Mitsunori Kurashige works in hard light, applying spare lines in geometric forms to outline, cross or define space.  A long career in large installation sculpture has brought the artist to the simplicity of the line, as employed with the minimal use of the powerful medium of light.  In work that speaks to any fan of native Californian work and its heritage of artists using light and space, Kurashige brings from Japan a universal mutual appreciation that knows no borders.

Arimichi Iwasawa produces video art installations that have reached a global audience, with a breakthrough exhibit at the Nagi MOCA in Okayama, Japan, where a pulsating LED form accompanied an epic screening of peaceful room swelling deep blue jellyfish alternating with hyper-realistic street interviews with Japanese women, shifting the feeling in the room and sweeping the viewer from one state of reflection to another.

 

LA ARTCORE - UNION CENTER FOR THE ARTS  


LA ARTCORE - BREWERY ANNEX  

Little Tokyo

120 Judge John Aiso Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 617-3274

Lincoln Heights

650 A South Avenue 21
Los Angeles, CA 90031
(323) 276-9320


< - - JULY 2014



SEPT 2014 - - >


YOELLA RAZILI
SCOTT GORDON

SUGURU HIRAIDE
STEVE HILTON
KAREN HANSEN


 

 

GO WOON CHOI
JOHN ROSEWALL
XI HOU

ITALIAN INT'L EXCHANGE SHOW
with ART 1307

Carla Viparelli
Amedeo Sanzone
Nicola Felice Torcoli
Maria Grazia Zanmarchi




 


 

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